Puppy Care Education  established 2004 

   Dog E-book Publishers

Home    About Us    Submissions    What is an E-book?  Birth to Eight Weeks  Dog Care Articles

What is Dog Grooming?     Why Do We Groom Our Dogs?     The 10 Grooming Steps    Dog Food Recipes

 

 

 

Dog Care Articles:

Toilet Training

Bloat

Separation Anxiety 

Socialising  your Puppy

 

 

 

Dog E-books

Operations Manual for the Xoloitzcuintli (Xolitzcuintla) by Amy Fernandez

 

NON-FICTION  

Amy Fernandez

Grooming E-books

Breed E-books

Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

Bulldog - British Bulldog

Chinese Crested Dog

Xoloitzcuintli - (Xolitzcuintla or Mexican Hairless)

Dog Care 

Puppy Care 

 

 

Operations Manual for the Xoloitzcuintli 

author - Amy Fernandez

 

E-book Price USD $7.99

FORMATS

 

Revised 2011 edition - with many more photos.

 

The complete illustrated guide to the Xoloitzcuintli, for judges, breeders and owners.

 

This e-book provides an illustrated, in depth examination of the Xoloitzcuintli breed against the standards that apply in its home country of Mexico, and as used by the American Xolo club.

 

Xolo owner, breeder and judge, Amy Fernandez, has many years of experience in owning and judging this breed, and has judged the Mexican Xoloitzcuintli specialty show in Tijuana.

Also a highly experienced author and journalist, Amy has, with this book, created the serious Xolo lovers bible.

EXTRACT

 

PREFACE

CONTINUITY OF CONSTRUCTION AND EVOLUTION OF TYPE

Selective breeding sometimes seems more complicated for hairless breeds, but in reality, the same rules apply. The hairless mutation represents just one facet of the process. Mutations—spontaneous genetic changes—are the ultimate source of genetic variation. Without them, evolution, or selective dog breeding, would not be possible.

Natural selection forms a species to fulfill a specific function. It is the breeder’s job to apply the same principles to artificial selection. No matter which selective process is directing a breed’s evolution, exactly the same genetic laws apply to the same thirty-nine pairs of chromosomes.

 Random breeding and outcrossing will provide a temporary barrier to health problems, but this approach will never offer any control or predictability to influence the type of dog you are producing. These dogs may be healthy, but the tradeoff is complete unpredictability in conformation, behavior, and genetic health.

By understanding the transmission of various breed traits, you can create a bloodline that will predictably conform to your expectations. Most of the genetic traits that we are seeking readily respond to straightforward selection. Decisions that you make for your breeding program may demonstrate results in one generation, will likely show results in the second and become predictably set into your line by the third.

 The first and most important step in breeding is a clear understanding of the elements of type that define your breed. Form follows function; this concept provides a logical framework by which to evaluate every trait.

Specialized breed traits do not develop randomly or independently.

Each one will enhance or impede functionality. Not every type found in a breed is equally functional. Breed function dictates the parameters of type. Evaluating variations within the context of functionality will clarify your breeding decisions.

Type, defined as the appearance of breed traits versus soundness, the ability to perform a function, is a perennial topic of debate.

The rationale presupposes that any breeding program must begin from a compromise either/or position, as if type and soundness were mutually inimical concepts. Accepting this faulty line of reasoning instantly limits your possibilities for success. If you understand the evolution of your breed’s type and continuity of construction, these concepts will become mutually reinforcing. More importantly, the dogs that you create will be prepotent for these traits, and capable of reliably transmitting them to the next generation.

A basic premise of animal breeding is the fact that undesirable traits are more often produced by recessive genes, because unwanted dominant traits are automatically selected out of the gene pool as they appear.  

* * * *

Our thanks go to Jan Carson for most of the Xolo photos used in the latest version of this e-book.

Original drawings are by the author, Amy Fernandez.

 

Useful Links -

http://www.xoloitzcuintliclubofamerica.com/

http://krystalxolo.com/  and http://www.aztecdancingdogs.com/ the sties for Leading US Xolo breeder and owner Jan Carson.

http://www.xoloaus.com/  - Wazzat Xolos, Australia's first and only Xoloitzcuintli kennel, pictures below are provided by Wazzat Xolo's

      

Pictures of Wazzat Xolo's dogs

 

Hit Counter

 

 

 

E-book DELIVERY

 

For Paypal sales:

your e-book will be emailed to you, as an email attachment, within 12 hours of purchase. Please contact us if there is a delay.

 

Smashwords sales: will be available for instant download.

PRICING:

 All book prices quoted on this site are in $US and prices may vary between distributor sites due to sales and special offers, which are beyond our control.

 

FORMATS:

When purchasing please specify the  format you require your e-book in by selecting from the drop down menu in the Paypal  box.